Troubled teens fundraising for their own support programme

| 14/10/2015 | 5 Comments

(CNS): Students from the John Gray High School are raising the cash themselves for a mentoring group that is helping to turn their lives around. According to the school counsellor, Chris Murray, BoyZ2men, which began at the school in 2009 and has a proven track record for getting at risk and troubled teens back on track, is funded from private sector sources and in order to expand the programme, the boys in the group have organized their own fundraising event.

All of the boys have been in trouble with the law at some point but the group makes a positive difference to the young teenagers, as it gives them an opportunity to spend time with leaders and role-models in the community. The group offers them the support that may be lacking at home and helps directly with the challenging behaviour that they display in class.

Supported by Murray, Simon Miller from the National Drug Council and PC Odale Mulgrave, the programme not only provides a place where the students can seek advice and support, it also offers practical assistance. This summer the boys spent time working in the community with one of their mentors learning various aspects of the construction industry and they also engaged in various outdoor activities and sports, from fishing trips to football. At the end of this month the boys will be playing a match against the RCIPS football team.

But the group needs resources and so the boys have organized an event this Friday at the skate park at Grand Harbour, where the youngsters will be showing off their DJ-ing skills and musical talents. The event is open to teenagers (13-19) across the island from private as well as government schools. All proceeds will be split between the mentoring programme and other school projects at John Gray.

Sick of being labelled as ‘bad boys’, the youngsters are determined to show they can do something right. Admitting that sometimes they get into trouble, they said recent headlines about the bad behaviour among government school students are exaggerated.

“Yes, we have made mistakes but the programme shows us how to learn from them,” the boys told CNS, as they appealed to the community to support their fundraising initiative.

The boys said the group is an important programme to them; it not only keeps them away from the criminal justice system, it helps them manage their studies and some of the challenges life is throwing them. They are hoping that the event will give them a chance to show what they can do and at the same time raise cash so that they can keep the programme going and help more young people who are in need of the support and mentoring it offers.

Cayman News Service

Category: Arts, Events, High School, Music, Schools

Comments (5)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    This program is very encouraging to hear about, at least somebody is trying! Good move school counsellor.

  2. PD's Bar and grill says:

    Please ask them to stop by PDS so we can have a chat and see how we can assist.

  3. SAM says:

    This should have been on a front page of every media outlet.

  4. Anonymous says:

    This is a wonderful fundraising idea. I hope the community supports your effort! I worked with “at-risk” youth for over 2 decades and ran many of these events. You will have alot of success with this as you are bringing in academics, careers, mentors from the community and love, love, love that you are having an athletic event with the RCIP at the end of the month. Keep at it and you will see how each year the success stories build! Where is the RCIP athletic event- I will be on holiday in GC at the end of the month- will that be open to the public? Hope so, would like to check it out!
    Good luck!

    • Anonymous says:

      Yes it is a wonderful idea and program…at last a good story!!! Thank you Mr. Christopher Murray…you’re always trying to make a difference from George Hicks days nuff respect!!

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