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Road-safety film targets young drivers

| 29/03/2016 | 0 Comments
CNS Local Life

Police Commissioner David Baines

(CNS): The RCIPS and Cayman 27 will be screening their safe-driving documentary, “Road Impact: Cayman Islands” for Year 11 students at John Gray High School on 4 April, after showing it at Clifton Hunter this week.  The documentary was entirely shot and produced in Cayman, and looks at the impact of serious and fatal traffic accidents on the lives of victims and their families.

Last year was one of the deadliest on record for road fatalities on the islands, and these special screenings intend to warn students of the dangers and responsibility that come with the freedom of driving.

“Any police officer will tell you that one of the most difficult things for them to do, in what is already a very difficult job, is to inform families of the death of a loved one,” said Police Commissioner David Baines, addressing an audience of about 200 students, “and sadly, my officers have had to do this all too often here in Cayman because of the careless or reckless behaviour of drivers.

“When watching this film you will get a better sense of what that is like.  I hope the stories of the people in this film stay with you and remind you of your responsibility to drive safely.”

Acting Chief Education Officer Lyneth Monteith said students need to see the film “as many fatalities on our roads have involved young people and these students will soon be of age to obtain a valid driver’s licence.  It is therefore timely for these students to view the film and engage in discussions on road safety and the need for change of behaviour”.

RCIPS officers active in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Operations and Community Policing Working Group for the Overseas Territories took the initiative to create the film as a compelling way to emphasise road safety around the islands.

Cayman 27 agreed to partner with the RCIPS on this project, and produced the documentary with entirely local content.

“The stars of this documentary are not those who made it, but the people who agreed to talk to us on camera, and relive tragic events,” said Paul Kennedy, one of the film’s producers.

“We think the impact of their stories on those who view it could make our roads just a bit safer.”

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Category: Police, Youth

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