New Adventist youth leaders take the helm

| 10/02/2017 | 0 Comments
CNS Local Life

Merle Watkins (centre) presents certificate to Denisha Dracket as Henry Vaughan looks on

(CNS Local Life): The Youth Federation of the Adventist Conference of Seventh-day Adventist passed the baton of service on Saturday, 4 February to a new slate of officers who will hold the leadership mantle for the next two years. The ceremony to install the new officers drew about 500 youth and their mentors to Kings Church.

The 16 officers for 2017-2019 will be responsible for a range of areas, including sports, community service and spiritual development. Heading the new slate is president Jodian McLeod and assistant presidents Kaneil Barrett and Kristen Reid.

The organisation is administered by the newly formed Adventist Youth Federation, which organised the event to recognise youth leadership from the various churches and other agencies.

Outgoing resident Saskia Lewis-Stephenson said that she was leaving with confidence that the future was in good hands: “Our future is bright,” she said. “It is so wonderful to see so many young people stepping up to the challenge.”

The mantra of the Youth Federation was “salvation and service,” explained Denisha Dracket, the director of that umbrella agency’s “Amplified” radio ministry, who was honoured for her 2015-16 leadership.

Taking his cue from the speakers before him, youth pastor Henry Vaughan said, “Young people are an invaluable resource – we need to make an investment in them,” adding, “The future of our cause depends on young people.”

After the presentation of the new leaders, youth elder Osmond Lynch charged the young people “to be transformed for service” and pleaded for the church as a whole to form a supportive partnership with them.

“Don’t judge what is on the outside,” he said. “God is working on the inside.”

The evening ended with special recognition of the service of Merle Watkins, associate youth ministries director and chair of the Youth Federation.

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Category: Youth

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