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What does the Transplant Council do?

| 11/09/2018 | 6 Comments

Do you know what the role of the Human Tissue Transplant Council is? Or purpose?


Ask Auntie, CNS Local Life, Caymanian status

Auntie’s answer: I have recently written about organ donation which mentioned the council (see Wants to register as an organ donor). Since that column, Gina Berry has been named the chair and council members have been appointed.

The main functions of the council, as set out in Section 5(1) of the Human Tissue Transplant Law, are:

(a) to advise the Minister responsible for health on policy relating to the collection and use of human tissue for medical purposes in the Islands;
(b) to monitor the donation of tissue by living persons and the removal of tissue from deceased persons;
(c) to regulate and supervise any business carried on in or from within the Islands in respect of the buying of tissue or the right to take tissue from the bodies of persons;
(d) to monitor compliance with this Law; and
(e) to perform any other duties that may be provided in this Law or as may be specified by the Governor in Cabinet, from time to time.

Included in the council’s remit is to create and maintain the Cayman Islands Human Tissue Donation Register, which will include the recording of all donations by having the donor complete a registration form.

The Ministry of Health should be providing updates on the formation of the register as well as registering as a donor, which will be announced on its website and Facebook page.

The law mentioned in this column can be found on the CNS library

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Category: Ask Auntie, Medical Questions

Comments (6)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    These roles do not sound like something that should be done by volunteers!! Sounds like significant expertise is needed to be able to:

    (a) to advise the Minister responsible for health on policy relating to the collection and use of human tissue for medical purposes in the Islands;
    (b) to monitor the donation of tissue by living persons and the removal of tissue from deceased persons;
    (c) to regulate and supervise any business carried on in or from within the Islands in respect of the buying of tissue or the right to take tissue from the bodies of persons;
    (d) to monitor compliance with this Law; and
    (e) to perform any other duties that may be provided in this Law or as may be specified by the Governor in Cabinet, from time to time.

  2. anonymous says:

    I thought the Transplant Council was responsible for rotating Civil Servants between departments so that 1. they don’t get bored and 2. they have an excuse for a higher salary.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Why would you need a religious person on this Council? This is the domain of medicine, law and policy.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Why should a religious person be disqualified? Are you accusing this person of being anti-transplant? If so, on what grounds?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Not anti-transplant…a bogus board of wholly unqualified and beyond their skill set. This industry encompasses sophisticated Billion-dollar criminal rackets in which we suddenly become a liquidation nexus, financial expertise is necessary, as well as oversight of complicated medical procedures for which most on this “supervision” committee haven’t the faintest medical clue or knowledge on how to officiate. Even the Enterologist, good as she may be in her field, has little relevant surgical experience from which to “supervise” these complex transfers.

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        • Anonymous says:

          The road to hell is paved with “experts.” This is a matter of public concern and a public board is necessary.

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