How do you find out if a road is private?

| 09/05/2019 | 9 Comments

The road down at the end of my street is in terrible shape. My neighbour tells me there’s no point complaining to the NRA about it because it’s not a “government road”. Apparently, there are roads which are government roads, which government should maintain, and quite a few other roads which are considered private roads, even ones which carry a lot of traffic. How does one find out whether a road is private or government?


Ask Auntie, CNS Local Life, Caymanian status

Auntie’s answer: Yes, there are both government and private roads in Cayman, and your neighbour is correct that if the road is private then the National Roads Authority would not be responsible for maintaining it.

But there it is a straightforward process to find out if the road you are enquiring about is public or private. All you need to do is call the NRA at 946-7780 or email nra@nra.ky and ask them.

If the road is private and you want to get in touch with the owner to discuss repairs, you need to go through the Lands and Survey Department to find out that person’s name. To do that, go to the public counter in the lobby of the Government Administration Building, which is open from 9:30am-4pm and ask to see the map showing the roads in Grand Cayman.

You will have to locate the road yourself. Most of the private roads are only identified by their block and parcel numbers and not by name. When you get that number, you can get access to the land register and find the name and address of the owner, for which there is a $5 fee.

Of course, there is no guarantee that the owner will repair the road, but there is certainly no harm is asking once you know who to contact. For more information on the Lands and Survey Department, here is the link to its website.

Send questions to auntie@caymannewsservice.com
or leave your question in the comment section of any article

Recent answers from Auntie (Click here for archives)

Tags: , ,

Category: Ask Auntie, Misc Questions

Comments (9)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sorry, Auntie, but an emailed query sent on 9th May to nra@nra.ky, as you suggested, has not produced a response to me.

    Auntie: I have checked with the NRA and was told they usually respond to queries within a week. If you don’t hear back by the end of this week, let me know, and I will inform the NRA official who will follow up on your question.

  2. Anonymous says:

    wondering if Market street is private? if it is not police should just sit there and ticket everyone that does not stop at either stop sign! it is almost every car everyday! they would make a fortune

    • The Society for the Abolition of Gated Communities says:

      In common with all of the roads in Camana Bay Market St. is private. Camana Bay has their own private ‘police force’ who walk around wearing funny hats but do not appear to take any interest in moving traffic.
      The real RCIPS cannot even enter Camana Bay without an invitation unless they actually observe a crime being committed.

      2
      1
      • Anonymous says:

        The Camana Bay “police force” is more concerned about harassing people that work in Camana Bay about parking in the staff lot vs. the parking garage than they are with preventing illegal parking or terrible driving habits in general. They’re a joke.

        • Anonymous says:

          Sad they have to pay people to keep the employees out of the customers parking spots.

          5
          2
          • Anonymous says:

            Agreed – however, the problem arises when you even try to offload office supplies and need to park temporarily. Most of the guards can’t recognize something as simple as that and will argue about it for a longer period of time than it would take to offload and move the car…

  3. anon says:

    You get the NRA to put it in at taxpayers expense and then plaster “private” signs at the entrance. There are special arrangements in the Brac connected with voting, I believe.

You can comment anonymously. Please read the CNS Comment Policy at the top of this page.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.